Present Perfect Subjunctive

Posted on 26th November 2012 in Conjugation

The Present Perfect Subjunctive

By Russell Sabo

The present perfect subjunctive mood (el pretérito perfecto compuesto de subjuntivo) is used in the same way the present perfect tense is used, with the exception being that it will be used after a conjunction, expression or verb which requires that one use the subjunctive mood. For example: Dudo que Simon haya cocinado la cena. – I doubt that Simon has cooked dinner.

How to Form the Present Perfect Subjunctive

Click here to learn more about the Present Perfect Subjuntive – Learning Spanish Like Crazy Level 3 Nivel 3

  1. The present perfect subjunctive is a compound tense, meaning that it will use the present subjunctive form of Haber (haya).
  2. Use the needed form of haya + the verb with the past participle.
    • (yo) Hablar – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya hablado”. que yo haya hablado…
    • (tú) Hablar – Hay receives “as” becoming “Hayas hablado”. que tú hayas hablado…
    • (Usted, él, ella) Hablar – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya hablado”. que Usted haya hablado. que él haya hablado. que ella haya hablado…
    • (nosotros/as) Hablar – Hay receives “amos” becoming “Hayamos hablado”. que nosotros/as hayamos hablado…
    • (vosotros/as) Hablar – Hay receives “áis” becoming “Hayáis hablado”. que vosotros/as hayáis hablado…
    • (Ustedes, ellos, ellas) Hablar – Hay receives “an” becoming “Hayan hablado”. que Ustedes hayan hablado. que ellos hayan hablado. que ellas hayan hablado…
  3. For verbs that normally end with ER and IR, add the same endings as the AR verbs to the subjunctive form of Haber, but use the normal past participle with the verb itself.
    • (yo) Comer – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya comido”. que yo haya comido…
    • (tú) Comer – Hay receives “as” becoming “Hayas comido”. que tú hayas comido…
    • (Usted, él, ella) Comer – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya comido”. que Usted haya comido. que él haya comido. que ella haya comido…
    • (nosotros/as) Comer – Hay receives “amos” becoming “Hayamos comido”. que nosotros/as hayamos comido…
    • (vosotros/as) Comer – Hay receives “áis” becoming “Hayáis comido”. que vosotros/as hayáis comido…
    • (Ustedes, ellos, ellas) Comer – Hay receives “an” becoming “Hayan comido”. que Ustedes hayan comido. que ellos hayan comido. que ellas hayan comido…
    • (yo) Vivir – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya vivido”. que yo haya vivido…
    • (tú) Vivir – Hay receives “as” becoming “Hayas vivido”. que tú hayas vivido…
    • (Usted, él, ella) Vivir – Hay receives “a” becoming “Haya vivido”. que Usted haya vivido. que él haya vivido. que ella haya vivido…
    • (nosotros/as) Vivir – Hay receives “amos” becoming “Hayamos vivido”. que nosotros/as hayamos vivido…
    • (vosotros/as) Vivir – Hay receives “áis” becoming “Hayáis vivido”. que vosotros/as hayáis vivido…
    • (Ustedes, ellos, ellas) Vivir – Hay receives “an” becoming “Hayan vivido”. que Ustedes hayan vivido. que ellos hayan vivido. que ellas hayan vivido…
  4. Here are the conjugated verbs once again with their meanings.
    • Hay+a=que yo haya hablado (that I have spoken, that I may have spoken), que yo haya comido (that I have eaten, that I may have eaten), que yo haya vivido (that I have lived, that I may have lived)
    • Hay+as=que tú hayas hablado (that you have spoken, that you may have spoken), que tú hayas comido (that you have eaten, that you may have eaten), que tú hayas vivido (that you have lived, that you may have lived)
    • Hay+a=que Usted haya hablado (that you (formal) have spoken, that you (formal) may have spoken), que él haya hablado (that he has spoken, that he may have spoken), que ella haya hablado (that she has spoken, that she may have spoken)
    • Hay+a=que Usted haya comido (that you (formal) have eaten, that you (formal) may have eaten), que él haya comido (that he has eaten, that he may have eaten), que ella haya comido (that she has eaten, that she may have eaten)
    • Hay+a=que Usted haya vivido (that you (formal) have lived, that you (formal) may have lived), que él haya vivido (that he has lived, that he may have lived), que ella haya vivido (that she has lived, that she may have lived)
    • Hay+amos=que nosotros/as hayamos hablado (that we have spoken, that we may have spoken), que nosotros/as hayamos comido (that we have eaten, that we may have eaten), que nosotros/as hayamos vivido (that we have lived, that we may have lived)
    • Hay+áis= que vosotros/as hayáis hablado (that you all (informal) have spoken, that you all (informal) may have spoken), que vosotros/as hayáis comido (that you all (informal) have eaten, that you all (informal) may have eaten), que vosotros/as hayáis vivido (that you all (informal) have lived, that you all (informal) may have lived)
    • Hay+an=que Ustedes hayan hablado (that you all (formal) have spoken, that you all (formal) may have spoken) que Ustedes hayan comido (that you all (formal) have eaten, that you all (formal) may have eaten), que Ustedes hayan vivido (that you all (formal) have lived, that you all (formal) may have lived)
    • Hay+an=que ellos hayan hablado (that they (males or a mixed group) have spoken, that they (males or a mixed group) may have spoken), que ellos hayan comido (that they (males or a mixed group) have eaten, that they (males or a mixed group) may have eaten), que ellos hayan vivido (that they (males or a mixed group) have lived, that they (males or a mixed group) may have lived)
    • Hay+an=que ellas hayan hablado (that they (all females) have spoken, they they (all females) may have spoken), que ellas hayan comido (that they (all females) have eaten, they they (all females) may have eaten), que ellas hayan vivido (that they (all females) have lived, that they (all females) may have lived)

Present Perfect Subjunctive and Reflexive Verbs

The reflexive pronoun will appear in front of the conjugated, present subjunctive form of Haber

  • levantarse – to get up
  • que me haya levantado
  • que te hayas levantado
  • que se haya levantado
  • que nos hayamos levantado
  • que os hayáis levantado
  • que se hayan levantado

When to Use the Present Perfect Subjunctive

The present perfect subjunctive is used in the same types of situations as the present perfect. However, with the present perfect subjunctive, the difference will be that it is used after conjunctions, expressions, or verbs that require the subjunctive form.

Main Clause in the Present With Dependent Clause in Present Perfect Subjunctive

When the main clause is in the present tense and the dependent clause requires the subjunctive and also speaks of a situation that may have occurred, then you will use the present perfect subjunctive mood.

  • Espero que tú hayas estudiado. – I hope that you have studied.
  • Cindy duda que ellos hayan llegado. – Cindy doubts that they have arrived.
  • Es ridículo que él haya traído la cerveza a la cena. – It’s ridiculous that he has brought beer to the dinner.

Main Clause in the Future with Dependent Clause in Present Perfect Subjunctive

When the main clause is in the future tense and the dependent clause require the subjunctive and also speaks of a situation that will have or may have occurred, then you will use the present perfect subjunctive mood.

  • Qué comerás después que los niños hayan ido? – What will you eat after the children have gone?
  • Jugaremos al fútbol cuando Mike haya regresado. – We will play soccer when Mike has returned.
  • Ella dará saltos de alegría cuando hayamos ganado la guerra. – She’ll jump for joy when we have won the war.

Hay and the Present Perfect Subjunctive

Haya habido is the present perfect subjunctive form of “Hay”. Haya habido translates as “there has been” or “there have been”.

  • Es cierto que haya habido demasiado nieve. – It’s certain that there has been too much snow.
  • Es un lástima que haya habido tantos actos de violencia. – It’s a pity that there have been so many acts of violence.

To say that “one must” or “it is necessary to”, you say “hay que”. To say this in the present perfect subjunctive, you say, “haya habido que”. This translates as “it has been necessary to” or “it may have been necessary to”.

  • Creo que haya habido que cantar más alto. – I believe that it may have been necessary to sing more loudly.
  • Ella duda que haya habido que arreglar la mesa. – She doubts that it may have been necessary to fix the table.

 

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Click here to learn more about the Present Perfect Subjuntive – Learning Spanish Like Crazy Level 3 Nivel 3
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